Lemon juice

Lemon juice is a Green food. Green foods are safe to eat as a regular part of a diet.

Category Quotes

Guideline related quotes related to Non-Starchy, Condiments and Green throughout Geoff Bond's publications.

Eat at least 2 3/4 lbs of mixed salad and vegetables per day, consisting of "Green-Green” and “Green” foods. Of these, at least 3/4 lb should be mixed salad. Also include at least 5 cups of “Green-Green” leafy vegetables or 2 1/2 cups of other vegetables per week. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.102

What about condiments? It's been said that the only way to get a kid to eat his vegetables is to smother them in ketchup. If that is what works, then it is tolerable; a good quality ketchup is not such a bad condiment. The main drawback is the sugar content. Read the ingredients label and only choose the best— there are low-salt, low-sugar versions available. Better yet is to make it yourself. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.107

Additional Quotes

Specific references to Lemon juice throughout Geoff Bond's publications.

( . . . ) stir-fry can be ready frozen; season with garlic, lemon juice, and herbs. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.89

Get in the habit of thinking that a salad is often in two parts: The salad vegetables, comprised uniquely of foods from Food Group 3 (Non-starchy Vegetables), and some additions of protein-rich foods from Food Group 6 (Meat, Poultry, Eggs, and Fish). You can add tuna or chicken breast, for example, to the salad or eat as a side dish. Use a simple homemade vinaigrette of mustard, olive oil, lemon juice, and vinegar. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.89

For dinner, a (...) stir-fry can be ready frozen; season with garlic, lemon juice, and herbs. Note that we are escaping the tyranny of the "starter, main course, and dessert" regimen. Instead, it's just the one course. As ever, try to eat the vegetables before anything else. A glass of dry wine is okay, too. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.89

Eliminate added salt in cooking; replace with herbs and flavoring like lemon juice. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.100

When cooking and eating, use herbs and flavorings like lemon juice. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.103

Water should still be the main drink; try carbonated water with a twist of lemon. Unsweetened tea, iced or otherwise, is also okay. ~Paleo in a Nutshell p.107

The British navy used to lose more sailors to scurvy than to warfare until the 1790s. Then, a discovery of naval surgeon James Lind was put into practice. Sailors were fed lemon juice on long voyages and scurvy disappeared "as though by m agic." We now know that scurvy is caused by a deficiency of vitamin C. ~Deadly Harvest p.44

The first marketed soft drinks appeared in 17th-century France as a mixture of water and lemon juice, sweetened with honey. ~Deadly Harvest p.78

Jacob Schweppe, a jeweler in Geneva, read Priestley's papers and, by 1794, was selling highly carbonated waters to his friends. He added other mineral salts and flavors, such as ginger, lemon, and quinine (to make tonic water). Schweppe moved to London and built a worldwide soft drinks empire. ~Deadly Harvest p.78

At table, use herbs and flavorings like lemon juice. ~Deadly Harvest p.178

Water should still be the main drink; try carbonated water with a twist of lemon. Tea, iced or otherwise, is also okay. ~Deadly Harvest p.183

Image Source

https://www.livestrong.com/article/500858-can-lemon-juice-dissolve-a-kidney-stone/